Laura Bynum

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LAURA BYNUM was born in Springfield, Illinois (Land of Lincoln) in 1968. She graduated magna cum laude from the University of Illinois, and earned an MA in Mass Media and Interpersonal Communications from Eastern Illinois University. She has extensive experience in marketing, corporate training and public relations. In 2006 she attended the Maui Writer’s Conference and was awarded its top prize—the Rupert Hughes Prose Award—for an early draft of VERACITY. She is currently at work on a second novel. She lives with her husband and three daughters in Virginia.

Photograph by Greg Ziegler

Books by this Author

WHEN LANGUAGE IS A CRIME, ONLY THE TRUTH CAN SET YOU FREE. Harper Adams was six years old in 2012 when an act of viral terrorism wiped out one half of the country’s population. Out of the ashes rose a new government, dedicated to maintaining order at any cost. The populace is controlled via government-sanctioned sex and drugs, a brutal police force known as the Blue Coats, and the slate, a mandatory implant that monitors every word a person speaks. To utter a forbidden, Red Listed word is...

My Life in 8 Words

Author Revealed

Q. What is your motto or maxim?

A. Be one with yourself and all things will come to you - Lao Tzu

Q. What are your 5 favorite songs?

A. Solsbury Hill (Peter Gabriel), the final movement in the Firebird Suite (Stravinsky), Cool Change (Little River Band), If You Want Me To (Ginny Owens), Mercy Me (Marvin Gaye)

Q. If you could eat only one thing for the rest of your days, what would it be?

A. Chex mix.

Q. What do you regret most?

A. Not having taken more risks in life.

Q. Who is your favorite fictional villain?

A. A lot of people would call him more of a vigilante than a villain, but I really love Rorschach (Watchmen). He's doling out justice according to the judge and jury of his own mind and doesn't realize he's committing the sin of judgement, and murder. What I love about Rorschach is that I think he's aware of this but feels it's his duty. I almost don't want to put him down as a villain, but how many people does he kill in his quest to affect justice? He's this wounded boy who's found a way to 'make right' the wrongs that surround him and who, in the end of the story, won't play the game of a few wrongs can equal one big right. He's old school and committed, and I love his dedication.

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